Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

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Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:30 pm

Table of Contents

(Search these terms with control+F to jump to the desired section.)

I. Introduction - What the Guide Aims to Teach You, and What Qualifies Me to Teach You
II. Basic Rules for All Deck Building
III. Combining Archetypes - Why? The Importance of Engines Explained
IV. Combining Archetypes - How? Finding Synergy Between Archetypes
V. Reinventing Older Archetypes
VI. Important Things to Remember When Playing Off-Meta
VII. Conclusion - Important Things to Take Away
VIII. Special Thanks, Guide Progress, and Other Things

I. Introduction - What the Guide Aims to Teach You, and What Qualifies Me to Teach You

Greetings, fellow duelist, and welcome to Yugioh Card Guide Forums!

If you're here, it means that you need some guidence in building decks that are either combining multiple ideas into one, or you are trying to bring up your favourite archetype back from its roots and into the competitive scene. Whilst you won't be winning a YCS anytime soon, winning casual games is still fun, so I am here to provide you with some tips on building outside the meta and how to have the greatest success in doing so. These ideas will help you with all decks, but moreso those that are less conventional. If you are looking for tips solely on top tier decks and how to win, I cannot teach you a lot, but the other guides on the forum may be more to your tastes.

In short, I am going to give you a rundown on the basics of how to find cards that match with your given idea, and how to turn a few notes on pen and paper into a full recipe. This will include gearing towards specific match ups, recognising your deck's weakness and how best to deal with it, how to tell apart a good combination of archetypes from a bad one, in addition to game mentality that will help you pull through the tier 3 grind. I'll be using some of my own example recipes to make the explanation easier, so don't worry, you should be able to understand everything. If you are ever stuck, have an idea you think I might enjoy or any other questions, either post on this thread or PM me, I will be happy to respond.

But what makes me qualified to give you advice? I have been playing the game on and off for ten years, and whilst I haven't made any ground breaking achievements in any international tournaments, I do have valuable experience in the casual scene, which is significantly hard to come by in long lasting players. Being around for so long, I have widespread knowledge of lesser known cards that fit into certain niche decks that a brief search on Yu-Gi-Oh Wikia simply won't find you. I have other guides on this forum, too, so if you'd like to read through those and check whether my skills are up to your standards, feel free. Without further ado, let's cover some of the basics.

II. Basic Rules for All Deck Building

Now, if you're a veteran at the game, you can probably skim over the points I'll cover further down. However, if you've only been playing for a short while, I'm going to go ahead and recommend that you read this guide. Whilst a little old, it provides very good fundementals for building any deck.

More specifically, I'm just going to cover a few pitfalls here that are common for players who are only used to netdecking the nearest AznEyesWhiteDragon or MegaCapitalG flavour of the month picks and then claiming it as their own. Don't fear, we've all been there.

For one, because you are combining archetypes does not give you permission to go over the sacred 40 card limit that Konami bestowed upon us. Yes, deck space will be tight - in some cases, extremely so. But as you already have multiple archetypes, you cannot afford to be dropping any more consistency by increasing the card count, and therefore decreasing your chances to draw into some of the best ones. More cards in the deck won't change the muddle in your hand when you clog, if anything it will add to it.

Side decks are important, whether you are playing Tier 1 or Tier 1,000. If you are playing a deck not in the meta, chances are you will have a fair amount of weak match ups. Don't just throw in 15 Wavering Eyes for those pendulum decks, really think about your side deck and how it will help you at least put up a fight against the top tier decks.

Read guides first, no matter how outdated (to an extent, use your own discression), on every archetype you plan on using. Checking multiple sources will help you find some hidden techs that you might not have thought of at first glance. Not everything has to be made from scratch in order for it to be creative, no one's going to see how much research you did if you just post a screenshot into DuelistGroundz (Or, why not post it here <3 ).

III. Combining Archetypes - Why? The Importance of Engines Explained

You might be wondering, "Why should I mix Archetypes together? Wouldn't that just make the deck less consistent and worse off?" The answer to that is yes and no.

Yes, because the whole point of Archetypes is that the cards synergise with each other. In short, cards within the same Archetype will usually mesh together well, and have effects that compliment each other to the point of producing combos. This is why batman and cookie cutter decks have fallen off the radar, since now the strength of every card in an archetype rolling off of one another is insurmountable to a bunch of staples thrown together. If you combine two archetypes, usually this will result in meaning less of these combo plays can occur, making your deck less powerful.

However: sometimes combining Archetypes can be beneficial for a deck, because the two Archetypes compliment each other and cover the other's weaknesses, or provide new strengths. To help illustrate this, I will be relying on a few examples.

The most common combination of Archetypes you will have seen is to use an "engine". This means to use a relatively small core part of an archetype to achieve something in a deck that the main Archetype cannot. Looking back a few years, this was seen in many Chaos Dragon builds. Players would utilise the milling of Lightsworn cards, in addition to the draw power provided by Solar Recharge, in order to increase the amount of cards sent to the graveyard that would fuel the swarm of boss monsters that Chaos Dragons are known for. This was a relatively large engine and took up a significant portion of the deck. Before the release of the new Lightsworn Structure Deck, it would have looked something like this:

3 Lumina, Lightsworn Summoner
3 Lyla, Lightsworn Sorceress
2 Ryko, Lightsworn Hunter
1 Jain, Lightsworn Paladin

3 Solar Recharge
1 Charge of the Light Brigade

As you can imagine, 13 cards is quite a lot of space in the deck. Because there were relatively few chaos cards at the time though, the deck still functioned rather well. Lightsworn monsters were able to cover the weakness of a lack of Light Attribute cards to banish and were able to also provide milling in general to bring out these monsters, who then more than covered for some lost card advantage in doing so. You'll notice that Judgment Dragon, arguably the most powerful Lightsworn card, was not included, but we'll discuss that in the next section,

A different take to look at is the HAT build, fully known as Hand, Traptrix, Artifact. This deck topped the leaderboards for months after its discovery, and of course, soon after took the netdeckers by storm. This example, is slightly different than the first. What made this deck good, was that only the very core cards of these Archetypes were included - a lot these cards were very strong when drawn on their own, and required little set up on the player's part to use their effects optimally. The combination of Traptrix "Trap Hole" cards and Artifacts proved to be a very tough defence to get past, the versitality of the two Archetypes allowing a response to every play in the opponent's hand. The Hands were also great at providing card advantage, and would force players to go into bigger monsters like Number: 101, Silent Honours ARK to get rid of them, which was susceptible to trap cards like Traptrix Trap Hole. This deck was an example of how smaller engines had enough power by taking the best elements of different Archetypes to rise to the top, proving that a solo Archetype is not always the optimal way to play a game of Yu-Gi-Oh! . In a sense, this deck used three different smaller engines to succeed.

If you're still following the trend of today's builds, you'll notice a new Speedroid engine has been used in rank 3 decks like The Phantom Knights, and this engine is very small and easy to understand, being made of just five cards:

3 Speedroid Terrortop
2 Speedroid Taketomborg

This engine allows you do make a rank 3 monster without using your normal summon (if you control no monsters), and without losing any card advantage. This isn't really combining two Archetypes into a whole deck, but it shows how you can learn to look outside the box in order to improve your own deck - an important lesson to learn.

IV. Combining Archetypes - How? Finding Synergy Between Archetypes

It's very easy to look at a deck after it's been built and then figure out the thought process and why the deck works from there. However, the tricky bit, is finding an initial idea to work on, or how to come to a solution to your deck's problems. Hopefully, I'll be able to simplify that for you.

The key is to find any existing weaknesses in an Archetype or deck idea. Let's think about what is bad about your deck: Is it inconsistent? Is it too slow? Does it run out of resources quickly? Testing is a good way to find these things out. Even if you're looking to combine decks, test out the Archetype you know you want to include indivually first, and then you should notice a trend or pattern in the reasons for your losses, and add an Archetype that can cover these problems.

Again, this might be difficult to understand from the outside, so I'm going to use some of my own recipe's to help explain it. That way, I can give you a run down on my thought process in building the deck. First, I'm going to show you a favourite of mine, Gishki Lightsworns:
Spoiler:
Image
"What makes the deck work?" I hear you ask. The initial problem with the Gishki Archetype is that they run out of resources very quickly, despite their recycling power in Gishki Aquamirror. Other side problems also included the deck's speed, and that it was very susceptiple to heavy backrow. So, as a potential solution, I need cards or a collective Archetype that provide draw power, recycling ability and spell and trap removal. Lightsworns provided these, to an extent:

Lyla / Synchro options for spell/trap removal
Recycling in milling cards. This one sounds confusing, but because Gishki Aquamirror is already able to recylce Aquamirror, being able to dump it in the graveyard repeatedly is very beneficial for the deck.
Draw power in Solar Recharge, milling Gishki Aquamirror to provide Trade-In targets.

Very rarely will you find two Archetypes that fit together perfectly, so take things with a grain of salt. This is a very hands on approach, however, and the two Archetypes are fairly old.

A newer combination I've attempted is combing the Prerelease "Metalphosis" archetype with Yang Zings, as shown below:
Spoiler:
Image
I was originally looking for an Archetype to combine with Metalphosis. There are only 6 cards, including extra deck, in the time of making this guide, so there was no way I could make a pure build. Obviously, since the Metalphosis monsters all destroyed your own cards, a good choice of Archetype would be one that could gain advantage of destroying their own cards. Three ideas came to mind: Scrap, Fire Kings and Yang Zing.

Scrap monsters can't benefit much off of the pendulum mechanic other than from Scrap Golem, and this is especially true for cards like Chimera who need a normal summon to use their effects. In addition, Scrap decks do not usually run a high monster count, and so finding the resources to make multiple fusions would be rather difficult - there was no real benefit to adding Metalphosis cards.

Fire Kings seem like a nice idea on paper, but actually, there were a few reasons why they wouldn't work. For one, Metalphosis had scales 1/8 - this means that Garunix could not be pendulum summoned, and therefore the deck would benefit very little. For another, Fire King Circle just wouldn't work on Metalphosis cards, as they would go to the extra deck, not the graveyard. The deck could work ok, but none of the problems Fire Kings have were really solved.

Finally, Yang Zing. They were a good choice because:

A) Metalphosis could be used as synchro material
B) Zefra Yang Zing monsters could be pendulum summoned for more plusses
C) Yang Zing have a problem popping their own monsters
D) Yang Zing Path means they can be recycled after being used for a fusion summon

The moral to take from this story is, some Archetypes seem like they would fit together on paper, but really, you need to consider all the angles. Solving a deck's weakness is usually the priority, just because they share some simple game mechanics does not necessarily mean they will fit together. Also, to just consider the destruction effects of the Metalphosis monsters is wrong. I had to also decide which archetype would benefit from the Pendulum mechanic, too.

If you're going to take one thing from this section, it's to look at solving a deck's weaknesses when putting two archetypes together. You can do this by looking at the strength of individual Archetypes, but sometimes you need to look at other mechanics of the deck, such as the popping of your own cards, or recycling of Aqua Mirror, as demonstrated above.

V. Reinventing Older Archetypes

VI. Important Things to Remember When Playing Off-Meta

VII. Conclusion - Important Things to Take Away

VIII. Special Thanks, Guide Progress, and Other Things

27/02/2016 - Publishing of first four sections completed in first draft

Thanks to you, viewer, for taking the time to look at my work <3
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Rowwdy Yisb
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:37 pm

Hello dudes.

If you want to know what this is, it's something I threw together about trying to build lower tier decks and combine different decks in a more casual sense of the game (because i am amazing at this game). I'd appreaciate any ratings you guys got for me, I should have a finished draft by tomorrow.

Thnx
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Gouki » Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:02 pm

0/10 this thing sucks
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:58 pm

Gouki wrote:0/10 this thing sucks
As do u
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Gouki » Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:36 pm

nah that's u
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Sun Feb 28, 2016 2:42 pm

My mate knows Bill Gates irl he will hack ur account if u keep this up
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Gouki » Sun Feb 28, 2016 5:47 pm

Rowwdy Yisb wrote:My mate knows Bill Gates irl he will hack ur account if u keep this up
at least i have a source now when i file a lawsuit against you and your mate
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Zanrith » Mon Feb 29, 2016 2:11 am

Since when is Yang Zing off meta

Back in my day it was tier 0
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Mon Feb 29, 2016 2:58 am

Zanrith wrote:Since when is Yang Zing off meta

Back in my day it was tier 0
Do not lie to yourself lmao this never happened
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Zanrith » Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:43 pm

Rowwdy Yisb wrote:
Zanrith wrote:Since when is Yang Zing off meta

Back in my day it was tier 0
Do not lie to yourself lmao this never happened
You're right it was tier -1 which is why I spent $500 on the deck
insert clever signature here

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Mon Feb 29, 2016 12:53 pm

Zanrith wrote:
Rowwdy Yisb wrote:
Zanrith wrote:Since when is Yang Zing off meta

Back in my day it was tier 0
Do not lie to yourself lmao this never happened
You're right it was tier -1 which is why I spent $500 on the deck
Business man Zan with a plan
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Zanrith » Mon Feb 29, 2016 2:35 pm

Rowwdy Yisb wrote: Business man Zan with a plan
Thats business dragon to you



Also good guide off meta is the way to play tbh
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Re: Be the Next Patrick Hoban, But Good at the Game: A Guide to Innovative and Off-Meta Builds

Post by Rowwdy Yisb » Mon Feb 29, 2016 3:16 pm

Zanrith wrote:
Rowwdy Yisb wrote: Business man Zan with a plan
Thats business dragon to you



Also good guide off meta is the way to play tbh
Thanks, I often see people post in Devk Advice and get inspired to play the game more to be honest, glad I'm not the only one who feels this way (:
ChaosDraGon00 wrote:Rowwdy's right
Bye YCG, thanks for all the good times.

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